You are currently viewing Use this info to make better CPAP machine decision

Use this info to make better CPAP machine decision

A continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) equipment is often used to treat sleep apnea, which affects millions of Australians. Many individuals believe that since a CPAP machine is too big for them to comfortably sleep on their side or stomach when using CPAP treatment, CPAP users must always sleep on their backs. There are several different types of CPAP masks, some of which are thicker than others. While some CPAP users must use a certain kind of machine, others are free to choose a machine based on their preferred sleeping position.

Be sure to follow your sleep specialist’s advice while choosing a cpap machine for sleep apnea treatment. Before altering machine types, talk to them to see whether your selected option would be a good fit for you. Each kind of machine has a specific shape that serves a certain function, and not all machine types are appropriate for all CPAP users.

Which CPAP Mask Works Best for Your Sleep Position?

The three kinds of CPAP masks that are most often used are full-face, nasal, and nasal pillow masks. Full-face masks are the bulkiest choice since they also cover the lips, unlike nasal masks which just cover the nose. Nasal pillow masks, which just cover the nostrils and have no hard shell, are the least obtrusive masks.

In addition to being uncomfortable, sleeping with your CPAP machine pressed against your face may lessen the efficiency of your treatment. To stop air leaking, CPAP masks need to be well sealed. A CPAP mask’s headgear may also interfere with sleep, particularly if it features abrasive plastic buckles or inflexible anchor straps. When choosing a CPAP machine, you should consider the mask’s footprint, including its length, width, and depth, as well as where the headgear will rest on your face. The goal is to discover a machine that is both useful and comfortable for sleeping.

Masks for side sleepers using CPAP

On your side, which prevents gravity from impacting your airway the way it does when you’re on your back or stomach, is one of the best sleeping positions for treating sleep apnea. Unfortunately, finding the appropriate CPAP machine may be difficult for side sleepers.

Because they are so high above the cushion, nasal pillow masks are a great choice for side sleepers who can manage them. Nasal pillow masks often retain their seal even in instances when some side sleepers may lean their faces toward the cushion. Nasal masks, which partly or totally surround the nose, are another option that is effective for many side sleepers. The best styles include soft, movable headgear and excellent sealing. However, because these characteristics don’t do much to halt air leakage, side sleepers may still need a CPAP-friendly cushion to support the thickness of even a nasal machine.

Use this info to make better CPAP machine decision

Masks for back sleepers using CPAP

Since even full-face masks fit well in this position, back sleepers using CPAP have access to a broad variety of machine choices. Even though lying on your back while using a CPAP machine may be optimal, gravity might cause the airways to collapse. If your doctor is aware that you sleep on your back and has not suggested that you alter positions, you will likely feel at peace wearing any machine that is effective and fits your other requirements. Even while some back sleepers have trouble wearing single-strap headgear, the position also makes it more difficult to take off your machine. For stomach sleepers, CPAP masks

Stomach sleeping is the least frequent sleeping position, and those who do so must take particular care while choosing a CPAP machine. Due to their positioning, the majority of masks press into the face, which is unpleasant and often causes air leakage. Depending on the size of your machine, your head may be pushed into a position that strains your neck and may cause pain or stiffness the next day.

Most people can only use a nasal pillow machine when sleeping on their stomachs for these reasons. Nose pillows are ideal for this because of their low profile; regardless of how you sleep, they won’t likely get unpleasant or dislodge. Check that your actual pillows can accommodate the machine, even if you use a nasal pillow machine. Some masks also include tubes around the temples, which might cause air blockage depending on your sleeping position and the firmness of your pillow.

Use this info to make better CPAP machine decision

Where can I get CPAP masks?

CPAP masks also require a prescription, much as CPAP machines. Despite this, there are several locations where you may get a CPAP machine. A prescription is still required by online merchants, and this prescription is often validated by having you upload or fax it to the store. As soon as your prescription is approved, you may make your purchase.

Although physical medical supply shops are also popular options and often more practical if you need a machine right now, the best CPAP machines and masks are frequently accessible through internet suppliers. Finally, a lot of sleep clinics and professionals provide a tiny range of CPAP masks for sale. Purchasing via your sleep specialist allows them to better oversee your treatment, despite their charges often being greater.

Utilizing a CPAP Pillow to Enhance Mask Fit

You should pick your CPAP masks depending on the advice of your sleep doctor since not all CPAP users can successfully use all CPAP machine designs. If the machine you must wear hinders you from sleeping in your preferred position, a CPAP cushion can be the answer. These cushions are more shaped than a conventional pillow to support masks, particularly heavier ones, even when you sleep on your side. Depending on the kind, they could also provide greater cervical support to stop neck strain or machine dislodging.

Final thoughts

A continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) equipment is often used to treat sleep apnea, which affects millions of Australians. Many individuals believe that CPAP users must sleep on their backs because a machine is too big for them to comfortably do so while undergoing treatment with a CPAP machine. There are several different types of CPAP masks, some of which are thicker than others. While some CPAP users must use a certain kind of machine, others are free to choose a machine based on their preferred sleeping position.